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New Research

NEW RESEARCH


SPAY/NEUTER CLINIC

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Although spaying and neutering may seem like it never changes, there is new research into the health effects and risks of spaying and neutering pets.  The newest research conducted on Golden Retrievers at the University of California Veterinary School recently became publically available.  It is widely considered to be the first comprehensive study to verify some of the negative side effects of spaying and neutering that have been observed and documented but never proved.  Click here to read the study.  The study reviewed the medical records of 759 Golden Retrievers comparing the incidence of hip dysplasia, cranial cruciate ligament rupture and malignant cancers lymphosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma and mast cell tumor.  The results were eye opening to many, including the public.  The results were also expected by thousands of veterinarians that for many years had claimed bad side effects of spay and neuter by were dismissed by many organizations.  At the very least, the results were troubling for early spay and neuter advocates.  Although the research was only conducted on Golden Retrievers, it is accepted that it will likely apply to other large breed dogs as well.  Now the question of when to spay or neuter your dog is more complicated and only the owner can decide what is best.

RESULT SUMMARY:

Please note:  For the study early spay/neuter was defined to be under 12 months of age while late spay/neuter was defined to be greater than 12 months of age.

Hip Dysplasia (HD)

  • The incidence of HD in early-neutered males was 10.3%, more than double the incidence in in-tact or late-neutered males.
  • The incidence of HD in spayed vs in-tact females was the same.

Cruciate Ligament Rupture (CCL)

  • The incidence of CCL rupture in early-neutered males was 5.1%.
  • In early-spayed females, it was 7.7%.
  • CCL rupture was not diagnosed in any of the in-tact animals studied, and in only 1 of 72 late neutered males.

Lymphosarcoma (LSA)

  • Early-neutered males had nearly three times the occurrence of LSA when compared to intact males.
  • No LSA was detected in late neutered males.
  • There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of LSA in spayed vs intact females.

Hemangiosarcoma (HSA)

  • Late-neutered females had a 7.4% incidence of HSA, over four times that of intact females (1.6%), and in early-neutered females (1.8%).
  • No differences were found between intact and neutered male dogs in the incidence of HSA.

Mast Cell Tumor (MCT)

  • MCT did not occur in the intact females but was diagnosed in 2.3% of early-neutered females and 5.7% of late-neutered females.
  • Neutering did not affect the incidence of MCT in male golden retrievers.

MULTIPLE STUDY SUMMARY:

Please note:  This is summary of results from various published research sources.

Female dogs:

EARLY SPAY

LATE SPAY

INTACT

Mast Cell Tumor (MCT)

2.3% risk

5.7% risk

less risk

Hemangiosarcoma (HAS)

4x increase

no increase

no increase

Lymphosarcoma (LSA)

no effect

no effect

no effect

Mammary Tumor

very low risk

low risk

very high risk

Cruciate Rupture (CCL)

7.7% chance

under 1% chance

under 1% chance

Hip Dysplasia (HD)

no effect

no effect

no effect

Urinary Incontinence

high risk

undetermined

low risk

Male dogs:

EARLY NEUTER

LATE NEUTER

INTACT

Mast Cell Tumor (MCT)

no effect

no effect

no effect

Hemangiosarcoma (HAS)

no effect

no effect

no effect

Lymphosarcoma (LSA)

3x incidence

no effect

no effect

Cruciate Rupture (CCL)

5.1% chance

under 2% chance

under 2% chance

Hip Dysplasia (HD)

10.3% chance

under 5% chance

5.1% chance

Aggression/Roaming

decreased risk

undetermined

high risk

Reactivity/Fearfulness

decreased risk

undetermined

high risk


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